Native Writes: Asking Questions


As a mother, I can’t help feeling deeply when something terrible happens to a young person.

Working on a story about Bryant Keck, a young man from Sanford who was critically injured in a traffic accident in Canada, my heart broke for every mother who would be touched by that single tragedy.

The crash was on Friday the 13th and he held on until late Tuesday. A TV station near where he was hurt stayed on top of the story and reported that he had succumbed to his injuries. He didn’t die alone; his mother was by his side.

Members of the LDS (Mormon) church send their children away to serve missions all around the globe and presume they will return home wiser and ready to lead in their church. It’s a cause for celebration, being called for a mission is a command to serve, usually far from home.

Last night, I begged God for answers as to why this case was different.

God seemed to whisper, as the old priest did when he didn’t have an answer, “‘Tis a mystery, my child. God will reveal it when it’s time.” I’m still waiting in a couple of cases.

Perhaps there are some things we will never know.

Last night, I begged God for answers as to why this case was different.

God seemed to whisper, as the old priest did when he didn’t have an answer, “‘Tis a mystery, my child. God will reveal it when it’s time.” I’m still waiting in a couple of cases.

Perhaps there are some things we will never know.

Having raised three sons, I could have been in that position. By the grace of God, I wasn’t.

Watching the play, “Book of Mormon,” several years ago, I laughed and cried. The young people were called to a mission in Uganda.

Souls were saved and people prayed together.

No one was killed or even injured. The binds they got into were eventually loosened and they continued working with the people.

In Summit County, we became friends with three missionaries and the Latino sheriff was a Mormon. To a person, they were focused upon helping us understand their faith.

They ate extra spicy Mexican food with great relish and confessed that community support was a blessing. They left us a farewell gift when we told them we were moving.

One stayed in touch for a while, then went on with his studies at Brigham Young University. That was 22 years ago, and I hope he has reached the pinnacle of his career in medicine.

He said it was to continue helping people in yet another remote location.

Right now, the San Luis Valley should allow the family space and time to deal with their grief. 

Knowing Sanford, many are related, and this death grieves them all. Mormons and non-Mormons should react with love.

Rest in peace, Bryant.

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